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Oct Faves-NS

October Favorites

Welcome to my sporadic monthly favorites! I always like doing these things, but I always forget to keep track of the things I do enjoy over the course of the month. (I feel like I have explained this already, but oh well.)

Film

20,000 Days on Earth
(source)

“It’s not necessarily a bad thing. It’s just a thing.”

20,000 Days on Earth
I didn’t get to watch a lot of movies while I was away—because movies cost an arm and a leg overseas, what the frak—but I did manage to watch 20,000 Days on Earth at the Roxie Theatre in San Francisco with my brother and it was amazing. It is about musician Nick Cave and his life and creative process, although reading this back… It’s much more than that. I was scribbling in my journal in the dark, hanging on to whatever gem I might be able to haphazardly write down, because I have recently rediscovered the importance of writing things down… Anyway. This film was just beautiful and fitting for an enigmatic person such as Nick Cave. Click here to learn more about it.

Singles
I also watched Singles, an oft-overlooked Cameron Crowe classic, for the first time, and what can I say? Bless you.

Books

Oct Faves-NS

What We See When We Read by Peter Mendelsund
I haven’t really read a lot of books that I like enough to call a favorite, so this will be brief. Just one! This one. It is beautiful… and brought me back to a place in my life when I was scared of words like phenomenology and semiotics (a.k.a. college; hi Mr. de Jesus! Hi Sir Oca!). Peter Mendelsund was a classical pianist for thirty years of his life before he quit at the ripe ol’ age of 34 and tried to pursue something different. Normally, he is behind book covers, but this is a new book of his that tries to dissect and think about the actual act of reading. What happens when we read, what do we see beyond the words, what is being constructed automatically by what we come to understand from the words that we read. It’s amazing and lovely (and so was he!) and there are pictures.

Places

Nevada - Instagram
Nevada
A welcome surprise as I was not looking forward to this leg of the trip… but we went to Red Rock Canyon, Lake Mead, and the Hoover Dam, and then I got really, really into the thought of Nevada. I posted some photographs on , but I’m still working towards the blog post for that.

A photo posted by Carina Santos (@presidents) on

The Last Bookstore
My friend Marvin took me here when we met up in LA, and wow, it was amazing. I wish I had a proper camera because I just want to show you guys everything. There is a path that snakes through the back and up the second floor into a few installations and a “labyrinth” of books where all the books are just $1 each. In the end, I picked up two books for cheaper than usual: Kelly Link’s Magic for Beginners and a collection of poems by Linda Gregg.

Oct Faves-NS-TLB

Food

Snyder’s of Hanover Honey Mustard & Onion Pretzels
OK, this was a real surprise. I hate mustard. I have hated it since I first saw it (childhood) and first tasted it (high school, from a classmate who was eating Piknik Honey Mustard. Hi Anna!) and I declared a quiet, seething war on mustard. And then I had a pretzel at a beer brewery and my life changed and I went through so many bags of this pretzel snack and I must say, writing about it, it’s making me want some more.

And that’s about that! I promise I’ll put more thought into these… I really do like making them. If you’re into beauty shit, I’ve got a monthly favorites up at my beauty blog, Softly Sometimes. See ya later.

Chelsea Part II

Chelsea, Part II & SoHo

Here’s part 2 of Chelsea! Part 1 can be found here. Ahem. So, the day after, we went back to Chelsea to see some galleries we missed the first time around. We went to some other places before that, though.

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The last time we were in New York, this monument didn’t exist yet, so what we did see was Ground Zero. I love how this monument looks, like the inside of a tower, buried deep into the ground.

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It is also close to the Shake Shack branch that has the shortest line.

I also bugged them to go to SoHo, because I had been able to see a bit of it when I met up with my friends—and they hadn’t—but it was perfect because we got to see the galleries that stayed in SoHo.

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My sister wanted to check out the Central Perk pop-up that opened over at LaFayette just a few days before, but the line was so long, so we just hung around outside. And walked on over to Team Gallery.

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Ryan McGinley, Team Gallery

This is… a very awkward exhibit to see with your folks, haha.

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Cory Arcangel, Team Gallery

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Aesop!

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We then had the bright idea to ride to Chelsea and walked a ridiculous amount of steps… because we got off at the wrong, a.k.a. not the nearest, stop. There were lots of cool things to see, but by the time we got to Chelsea, we were so tired.

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This is the highlight of my Chelsea visit:

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Jacob Hashimoto, Mary Boone Gallery

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Rachel Ann Hovnanian, Leila Heller Gallery

And another one of the neon signs by Rachel Ann Hovnanian. See if you can find me!

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There was also a great tour bus lurking around the area during our visit.

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And something that made me laugh an embarrassing amount.

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On the way home, I saw this lady with this bag. :)

25

25 Things I’ve Learned So Far

This is a list slated to have been posted when I turned 26, a few weeks ago. I spent my birthday on board a plane, and then shaken (angrily) awake for a surly dinner—sorry parents!—in Chicago, at a restaurant where they made their garlic bread with truffle oil.

Suffice to say that I have been hard-pressed to think of twenty-five actually useful things that I’ve learned in the past twenty-five years, or approx. 9,125 days, that weren’t just vague and uplifting reminders unnecessary for me to repeat. I also have been thinking about my place in the world and how I am pretty much ill-equipped to dole out any sort of advice to anyone. But then I realized that this didn’t have to be beneficial advice (hah). I could just share some things that I found to be true, for me, personally. Emphasis on personally.

After much eyebrow-furrowing and mental filing away, it is now nearing the end of October, and I think I finally have my list of 25.

1. You will always find an excuse. Don’t make them.
2. Your brain is not wired to the Internet. Take tangible note of important things because you WILL forget.
3. Trying to please everyone doesn’t work, and you end up hating yourself in the process.
4. The most valuable currency in life is kindness.
5. The world doesn’t owe you shit. Owning this truth makes it easier to accept other truths.

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Chelsea, Part I

Chelsea, Part I

Chelsea is a little pocket of streets in New York City to which most of the art galleries have moved to from their previous nesting spot in SoHo. (At least, that’s how I understand it.) You cannot go around Chelsea in one day and not feel overwhelmed. It’s just not possible. First, the trains are quite a walk from the actual vicinity of streets—especially if you get off at a farther away stop—and then, when you get there, all you will do is walk around and try to approach the next gallery and the next artists with a blank mind.

Here is what Chelsea looked like to me, with information on some of the artists/galleries to be supplied later on, if I have not given up on finding out! As is hinted at by the title, there will be a “part 2,” as we did return for a second look at the galleries we might’ve missed.

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We saw these sculptures by Deborah Butterfield everywhere after seeing them here, at Danese Corey.

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Efrain Almeida, CRG Gallery

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Stoner

Casual Consumption No. 5

A photo posted by Carina Santos (@presidents) on

Books

According to my GoodReads account (let’s be friends!), I have finished quite a few books since I last a Casual Consumption update posted weeks (months?) ago. Most notable was John Williams’ Stoner, a book that has been recommended to me enough times that I decided to finally pick it up when I ran across it at the NYPL bookstore. I don’t like this cover… but that doesn’t matter because the novel is wonderful. To explain it would risk creating an impression that it’s dull, when it’s the absolute opposite.

I also finally finished Sophia Amoruso’s very widely-lauded #GIRLBOSS, which to be honest was more “meh” than anything. Like I told my friend, it just felt like having a conversation with a friend that goes on for far too long. This is honestly very lackluster.

I finished two audiobooks: the BBC adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere (which is, in book form, perhaps my favorite Gaiman novel of all) and Veronica Roth’s Divergent. On Neverwhere, I don’t love it, and I think the book is way better and James McAvoy’s Richard Mayhew made me dislike Richard a lot. On Divergent, sorry, but I don’t hate it?

I’m currently in the middle of Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, because of course, and Peter Mendelsund’s What We See When We Read, which is all kinds of amazing (so far, but this is unlikely going to change, because I am a biased P.O.S.).

Music

I was able to catch a few shows on vacay, namely: Beach Fossils (Chicago), Tweedy (SFO), The Drums and Beverly (SFO), and Thurston Moore and Sebadoh (SFO), but lately, all I’ve been listening to are variations of pop (via the US radio) and The Drums.

I’ve been thinking of making mixes more, though. I think I process music in a way that I like more when I do.

Film

I caught two films in the States: Gone Girl and 20,000 Days on Earth. Both are great in different ways, but me taking notes in my journal while watching 20,000 Days can probably tell you just how much I liked that one. 20,000 Days is about Nick Cave (and his own 20,000 days) and it is beautiful. We saw it at an old theatre-turned non-profit and it was just so nice that there was a place dedicated to showing films that don’t have a lot of distribution.

Other Things I Have Consumed

I watched a hit play! My sister and I caught The Book of Mormon and had a grand time. It cost an arm and a leg, but I really, really liked it.

As for food… I’ve been really loving everything bagels, cream cheese on any type of bread-food, sushi, french fries, and Things Doused in Truffle Oil. Gordon Ramsay would die at my plebeian taste buds, but I can’t say that I hate truffle oil, nosiree.

I haven’t been regularly watching television, because I had no idea when things are actually on and when I do, I have somewhere else to be, but I did enjoy binging on Shark Tank! If that counts?

OK, y’all. I think that might be it? I’m running behind on both errands and posts and my work stuff, so fingers crossed that I’ll get to do all of them in a timely fashion, and that I’m not being a delusional wishful thinker.

What have you been enjoying lately?

Full Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links.

Sunday Currently

The Sunday Currently Vol. 2

Hello! I haven’t done this in a while—and it’s kind of embarrassing that this is only VOLUME TWO—you should pity the fool, who in this case is me.

Reading

I dipped back into Sophia Amoruso’s #GIRLBOSS, which I abandoned a while back, and am starting to get into the meat of Peter Mendelsund’s What We See When We Read, which is a beautiful object, book content aside. Recently, I finished John Williams’ Stoner, which was tragic and beautiful and something I’ll probably write about… soon ish.

Writing

Just journaling for now, but I want to write something substantial soon. Ish. HAHA I AM A SAD SACK, SEND HALP.

Listening

I am on a The Drums hangover again. I recently saw them in San Francisco, luckily snagging cheap re-sold tickets on Craigslist (thank you, Ben!) and I can’t get them off my mind.

Thinking

What L.A. is like these days. I haven’t been since 2008.

Smelling

Commodity Book, which is my leftover smell from yesterday, which I don’t quite understand because I took a bath?

Wishing

Nothing in particular. I am pretty content right now. Maybe to have one more of those ginger cookies from Blue Bottle Coffee.

Hoping

What is the difference between a wish and a hope?

Wearing

A… The Drums shirt. HEH.

Loving

OH, I recently discovered honey mustard. AND WOW? WOW????

Wanting

More time to finish this post because I’ll be boarding soon.

Needing

A nap!

Feeling

Pressed for time. Lalalala, this is turning out to be a disappointing post, I am sorry.

Clicking

Zadie Smith’s Find Your Beach

The Sunday Currently Origins

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective

If not for this retrospective by the Whitney Museum, my pedestrian familiarity with Jeff Koons would remain pedestrian. Although I suppose that’s what retrospectives are for. Prior to seeing the Jeff Koons Retrospective, the strongest image I had of him was tied to a balloon animal. I think he is probably one of the artists who produce quite polarizing work, especially as viewed by the general public or art snoots, and his portfolio has undoubtedly raised the question of what art is and isn’t a hundred million times.

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective

The retrospective takes you on a quite literal journey, a progression of Koons’ work, so far. A common strain in his work is the appropriation of common objects, reworking them to possibly mean something other than what we currently take them to mean. Because these objects are so mundane, the validity of Koons’ pieces as “art” is always questioned, but there is a clear thought and reason for why these pieces are the way they are.

If you plan on going to see the retrospective (which you should, anyway—it’s up until October 19!), be sure to avail of the free audio tour because it helps clarify the intention of Koons with his art, after which you can decide for yourself whether or not he succeeds with his execution.

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective
The New

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective

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Sol LeWitt

New York in September via the MoMA

I always mean to post about my American exploits, but the thought of filtering through the images I’ve captured (so many) has halted me, and so here we are, three weeks in, and I’m trying to recall the first full day—a Saturday—we spent in New York City. Predictably, we spent most of it in a museum.

I sifted through hundreds of photographs (you’re welcome), but I think I’ll post some of the “rejects” somewhere else or something. I don’t know if I want to post about each of the places we went to, mostly because I am daunted, but I like having a record and (over)sharing things so here we are.

One of my favorite museums is the Museum of Modern Art (aka, MoMA). This is where I discovered a lot of the art that resonated with me, back when I didn’t really care much for a lot of art, as well as its history.

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Joan Mitchell

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Me, lol. The day I wore this scarf thing was the day I ran into many dogs who were also wearing this scarf thing.

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A special exhibition on Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (on view: “The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters“) was ongoing and I was so happy seeing work from him, apart from the posters of his that I was familiar with.

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We caught the installation of Robert Gober’s The Heart is Not a Metaphor, and though we didn’t get to catch it, the structures set up to keep us bystanders out of the installation, the act of and transition of the installation was so beautiful anyway.

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On view: “Conceptions of Space: Recent Acquisitions in Contemporary Architecture

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Sol LeWitt

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Eve Fowler

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Matt Mullican

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Matt Mullican

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Seth Price

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Marcel Duchamp

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Marcel Duchamp

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Robert Rauschenberg

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Jasper Johns

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Joseph Kosuth

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Jorge Eielson

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Claude Monet

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Frida Kahlo

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Roy Lichtenstein

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Robert Rauschenberg

I made a Made-Up History look for this work (It’s called “Bed”) a few months ago, which you can see here. Made-Up History is a series for Softly Sometimes, my beauty blog, in which I try to make makeup looks inspired by art work.

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Frank Stella

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Kazimir Malevich

I also made a Made-Up History look on this painting, which you can see over here! Incidentally, a palette I received from MAKE Colour was perfect for it.

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Joan Miró

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Henri Matisse

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Pablo Picasso

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Andrew Wyeth

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Joan Miró

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Bruce Nauman

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Andy Warhol

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Andy Warhol

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Ed Ruscha

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On view: Christopher Williams’ “The Production Line of Happiness”

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Nilo Ilarde's Faulty Landscape

Nilo Ilarde’s “Faulty Landscape”

On display at Art Informal until September 22 is Nilo Ilarde’s Faulty Landscape. Although they usually have simultaneous exhibits at AI, Ilarde’s brain space has occupied the three rooms and it is beautiful.

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This isn’t the first time he’s worked with artists’ cast-offs, a mix of debris that permeate a painter’s home or studio. With paintbrushes, he creates a topography and with caps from the paint tubes, he creates a sky. This is also the first time I’ve seen a deconstruction and dissection of the paint tubes, however, when he peels away the wrapper to reveal the unused paint inside. The lazy thinker in me thinks that this is a manifestation of potential. Read More

sunday-currently

The Sunday Currently Vol. 1

Again, another attempt at keeping up with a series. I kept seeing this on Helga’s and Camie’s, so I thought I’d jump in on it, too. The link-up link can be found down below! I think these are simple, nice updates that are easy enough to do. So, here goes!

Reading

I’m currently re-reading Harry Potter & the Sorceror’s Stone by You Know Who, and it’s been nice so far. I’m looking to cross off a few books on my To Be Read pile before I leave, but I’m not sure if that’s feasible. I also bought the latest issues of Grid, Esquire Philippines, and Preview, so those are some of my reading material at the moment.

Also, I managed to snag a copy of Allan Balisi’s newest zine, Before Us, Nothing Existed Here, which is b e a u t i f u l.

Writing

I have a few “pending” articles I want to roll out before leaving, again, but I’m not working on them right now.

Listening

Ang Bandang Shirley, forever and ever. I just came from the video launch for “Nakauwi Na” last night. Congratulations Shirley, Sarie, and the Seabiscuit team!

Thinking

Deadlines, packing, and plans for the immediate future.

Smelling

Commodity Moss, which I wore today!

Wishing

More time, always.

Hoping

I get everything done in time.

Wearing

Pantulog and weird makeup experiment this beautiful Sunday night/Monday morning.

Loving

Wearing weird makeup experiments outside the house. All the new Ultra Stretch Jeans from Uniqlo because I’ve got a butt that just won’t quit. And this butt needs some stretch, always.

Wanting

A magic spell to clean my room up because it looks like a crime scene, currently.

Needing

To stop making excuses! Get your shit together, Carina!

Feeling

Stuck but motivated, which is a start. So I guess, optimistic, too.

Clicking

Catching up on yesterday’s issue of Supreme, and my tab is currently opened to Don’s “Human Nature

The Sunday Currently Link-Up

Photograph is a work by Kiri Dalena called “Liar!” which I photographed today, when I visited What does it all matter, as long as the wounds fit the arrows?, a tribute to Roberto Chabet at CCP, on display until October 26.